UAMS Department of Neurobiology and Developmental Sciences - Joints and Ligaments Tables

Gross Anatomy


All Joints and Ligaments - Organized by Region

Copyright 2009, Department of Neurobiology and Developmental Sciences, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences



Back Thorax Abdomen Pelvis and Perineum Upper Limb Lower Limb Head and Neck


Joints and Ligaments of the Back Region - Listed Alphabetically

Joint or ligament Description Notes
anterior longitudinal ligament a ligament that courses from superior to inferior along the anterior surfacesa of all vertebral bodies it lies directly posterior to the thoracic and abdominal viscera
interspinous ligament a ligament that connects the spinous processes of two adjacent vertebra a syndesmosis
intervertebral disc a fibrocartilaginous disk between adjacent vertebral bodies a symphysis; it is composed of two parts: an outer anulus fibrosus and an inner nucleus pulposus; the nucleus pulposus is the remnant of the notochord; the intervertebral disks are important shock absorbers between vertebrae
ligamenta flava a ligament formed predominantly by elastic fibers which joins the laminae of adjacent vertebrae a syndesmosis; paired; the ligamentum flavum is penetrated by the needle during spinal tap; the word flavum is derived from the Latin word flavus, which means "yellow" - a reference to the predominance of yellow elastic fibers which gives this ligament its grossly visible color
nuchal ligament a midline ligament that extends posteriorly from the spinous processes of cervical vertebrae and extends from the base of the skull to the 7th cervical vertebra a syndesmosis; it provides muscle attachments to the cervical spinous processes without the necessity of long spinous processes that would hinder extension of the neck
posterior longitudinal ligament a ligament that courses from superior to inferior along the posterior surfaces of all vertebral bodies it is broader at the intervertebral disks and narrow at the vertebral bodies which gives it a scalloped edge; it is located in the vertebral canal; it is NOT penetrated by the needle during spinal tap
supraspinous ligament a ligament that connects the tips of the spinous processes of thoracic and lumbar vertebrae a syndesmosis; the supraspinous ligament begins at the C7 vertebra and ends at the mid-sacral segmental level; it serves as a muscle attachment site
zygapophyseal joint a small joint between the articular processes of adjacent vertebrae a synovial plane joint


Joints and Ligaments of the Upper Limb - Listed Alphabetically

Joint or ligament Description Notes
acromioclavicular joint the joint between the distal end of the clavicle and the acromion of the scapula a plane synovial joint; the shape of the articulation encourages the acromion to slide inferior to the clavicle during dislocation (shoulder separation) a condition that occurs when the coracoclavicular ligament is torn; a small articular disk occurs within this joint capsule
annular ligament the ligament that encircles the head of the radius it forms 4/5 of a circle - the radial notch of the ulna forms the other 1/5; it attaches to the margins of the radial notch; it holds the head of the radius against the ulna and cups in distal to the head to provide restraint against distal dislocation of the radius
carpometacarpal joint, finger the articulation between the distal carpal bones and the proximal ends of the metacarpal bones of the hand a synovial plane joint; limited motion is permitted at the carpometacarpal joint; the carpometacarpal joint is reinforced by dorsal and palmar ligaments
carpometacarpal joint, thumb the articulation between the trapezium and the proximal end of the metacarpal bone of the thumb a synovial saddle (sellar) joint; this articulation permits two planes of motion: flexion/extension and abduction/adduction which may be combined to produce circumduction
coracoacromial ligament the ligament that connects the coracoid process to the acromion of the scapula it passes superior to both the head of the humerus and the supraspinatus tendon; it provides support for the head of the humerus that prevents superior dislocation
coracoclavicular joint the joint between the coracoid process of the scapula and the inferior surface of the lateral portion of the clavicle a syndesmosis; this joint provides stability to the acromioclavicular joint
coracoclavicular ligament the ligament that connects the upper surface of the coracoid process to the under surface of the clavicle it has two parts: conoid ligament (posteromedial part) and trapezoid ligament; tearing of the coracoclavicular ligament permits the acromion to move inferior to the distal end of the clavicle (shoulder separation), a condition which could result from a fall on the point of the shoulder
costoclavicular ligament a ligament that attaches the clavicle to the first rib it resists superior displacement of the proximal end of the clavicle; the combined effect of this ligament, the sternoclavicular ligament and the interclavicular ligament is to produce a very strong sternoclavicular joint that seldom dislocates
elbow joint the joint between the distal humerus and the proximal radius and ulna a synovial hinge joint; the elbow joint is a complex joint consisting of humeroradial, humeroulnar and proximal radioulnar articulations all within a common articular capsule; it is strengthened by the ulnar and radial collateral ligaments
glenohumeral ligament, inferior a ligament reinforcing the anterior wall of the capsule of the glenohumeral joint it connects the humerus to the scapula; a thickening of the anteroinferior shoulder joint capsule
glenohumeral ligament, middle a ligament reinforcing the anterior wall of the capsule of the glenohumeral joint it connects the humerus to the scapula; a thickening of the anterior shoulder joint capsule
glenohumeral ligament, superior a ligament reinforcing the anterior wall of the capsule of the glenohumeral joint it connects the humerus to the scapula; a thickening of the anterosuperior shoulder joint capsule
intercarpal ligaments, dorsal a series of short ligaments that connect adjacent carpal bones on their dorsal aspects intercarpal ligaments reinforce the articular capsule of the intercarpal joints; they prevent excessive movement of these synovial plane joints
intercarpal ligaments, palmar a series of short ligaments that connect adjacent carpal bones on their ventral aspects intercarpal ligaments reinforce the articular capsule of the intercarpal joints; they prevent excessive movement of these synovial plane joints
interclavicular ligament a ligament that reinforces the capsule of the sternoclavicular joint it spans the superior surface of the sternoclavicular joint and manubrium of the sternum; the combined effect of this ligament, the sternoclavicular ligament and the costoclavicular ligament is to produce a very strong sternoclavicular joint that seldom dislocates
intermetacarpal joint the articulation between the adjacent sides of the proximal ends of metacarpal bones 2-5 a synovial plane joint; limited motion is possible between at the carpometacarpal joints or between adjacent metacarpal bones
interosseous membrane, forearm a fibrous membrane that connects the interosseous borders located on the shafts of the radius and the ulna a syndesmosis; its fibers are oriented obliquely downward from the radius toward the ulna; the interosseous membrane is the classic example of a syndesmosis; proximally directed forces from the hand pass through the radius and are transferred to the ulna through the interosseous membrane; marked proximally by the oblique cord
interphalangeal joints the articulations between the proximal and middle phalanges (proximal interphalangeal joint, abbreviated PIP) or the middle and distal phalanges (distal interphalangeal joint, abbreviated DIP) a synovial hinge joint; these joints are strengthened by medial and lateral collateral ligaments
metacarpophalangeal joint the articulation between the head of a metacarpal and the base of a proximal phalanx a synovial condyloid (or ellipsoid) joint; it is strengthened by medial and lateral collateral ligaments; the joint has two planes of motion: flexion/extension and abduction/adduction which may be combined to yield circumduction
midcarpal joint the joint which connects the proximal and distal rows of carpal bones a series of synovial plane joints; small ranges of motion are permitted between carpal bones which take on an additive effect because there are several articulations in a proximodistal row (wrist, midcarpal and carpometacarpal joints); the midcarpal and intercarpal joints are reinforced by numerous ligaments
oblique cord a thickening of connective tissue fibers at the proximal end of the interosseous membrane it connects the proximal end of the shaft of the radius to the proximal end of the shaft of the ulna
radial collateral ligament, elbow a ligament spanning the lateral side of the elbow joint it connects the lateral epicondyle of the humerus with the radius and the annular ligament; it reinforces the lateral side of the elbow articular capsule; it is smaller and less distinct than the ulnar collateral ligament
radial collateral ligament, wrist it connects the styloid process of the radius with the scaphoid and trapezium it reinforces the articular capsule on the lateral side of the wrist
radiocarpal (wrist) jointsynovial, ellipsoidalcharacterized by an intracapsular articular disk; radius articulates with the proximal row of carpals
radioulnar joint, distal the articulation between the head of the ulna and the ulnar notch of the radius a synovial pivot joint; this joint has a fibrocartilaginous articular disk that attaches to the styloid process of the ulna and the medial side of the distal radius
radioulnar joint, intermediate the articulation formed by the interosseous membrane a syndesmosis; it connects the interosseous border of the ulna to the interosseous border of the radius; proximally directed forces from the hand pass through the radius and are transferred to the ulna through the interosseous membrane
radioulnar joint, proximal the proximal articulation between the radius and ulna that is contained within the capsule of the elbow joint a synovial pivot joint; it is the articulation between the head of the radius and the radial notch of the ulna which is completed by the annular ligament
shoulder joint the articulation between the head of the humerus and the glenoid fossa of the scapula a synovial ball and socket joint; the glenoid labrum deepens the socket; glenohumeral ligaments reinforce the joint capsule anteriorly; the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii m. passes through the shoulder joint cavity; the shoulder joint is supported by the muscles of the rotator cuff group (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor and subscapularis); also known as the glenohumeral joint; it is frequently dislocated
sternoclavicular joint the joint what connects the clavicle with the sternum a synovial joint; its joint capsule is subdivided by a fibrous articular disc; it is strengthened by the sternoclavicular, interclavicular and costoclavicular ligaments; the sternoclavicular joint has the range of movement, but not the form, of a ball and socket joint
sternoclavicular ligament a ligament that reinforces the capsule of the sternoclavicular joint the sternoclavicular ligament has two parts: anterior and posterior; it is a very strong ligament; the combined effect of this ligament, the costoclavicular ligament and the interclavicular ligament is to produce a very strong sternoclavicular joint that seldom dislocates
transverse humeral ligament the ligament that spans the intertubercular sulcus of the humerus it connects the greater tubercle of the humerus to the lesser tubercle of the humerus and acts to retain the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii m. in the intertubercular sulcus
transverse metacarpal ligament, deep a ligament that connects the metacarpophalangeal joints 2-5 on their palmar surface limited motion is permitted between the distal ends of adjacent metacarpal bones due to the presence of the deep transverse metacarpal ligaments; the metacarpal bones are bound together to form a solid foundation for finger movements
transverse scapular ligament, superior a ligament that spans the suprascapular notch of the scapula it converts the suprascapular notch into a foramen; the suprascapular a. passes superior to the ligament and the suprascapular n. passes inferior to the ligament (Army over the bridge, Navy under the bridge)
ulnar collateral ligament, elbow a strong ligament spanning the medial side of the elbow joint it connects the medial epicondyle of the humerus with the ulna; it reinforces the medial side of the elbow articular capsule
ulnar collateral ligament, wrist it connects the styloid process of the ulna to the pisiform and triquetrum it reinforces the articular capsule on the medial side of the wrist
wrist joint the articulation between the distal end of the radius and the proximal row of carpal bones a synovial ellipsoid joint; two primary degrees of motion are permitted: abduction/adduction and flexion/extension - these motions are combined to produce circumduction; the radius actually articulates with the articular disk which in turn articulates with the proximal row of carpal bones (scaphoid, lunate and triquetrum)


Joints and Ligaments of the Head and Neck - Listed Alphabetically

Joint or ligament Description Notes
coronal suture the articulation between the frontal bone and the two parietal bones a suture
intermaxillary suture the articulation between the palatine processes of the right and left maxillae a suture; it is a midline feature of the hard palate and marks the line of fusion of the two palatine shelves (secondary palate) during development
lambdoidal suture the articulation between the occipital bone and the parietal bone a suture
metopic suture the articulation between the two ossification centers of the frontal bone a suture; a midline structure, it usually disappears during development but is occasionally present in adults
pterion the articulation between four bones: the greater wing of the sphenoid bone, the frontal bone, the parietal bone, the squamous part of the temporal bone a suture; this is a site of relatively thin bone that is frequently fractured in blows to the side of the head; the middle meningeal a. is located deep to this site and may be injured in skull fractures at this location, leading to epidural hematoma
sagittal suture the articulation between the two parietal bones a suture; it is a midline structure that lies superficial to the superior sagittal venous sinus
sphenomandibular ligament the ligament that attaches to the spine of the sphenoid bone superiorly and the lingula of the mandible inferiorly paired; it is a specialization of the pterygoid fascia and is a remnant of the mesenchymal core of the first pharyngeal arch (Meckel's cartilage)
squamosal suture the articulation between the parietal bone and the squamous portion of the temporal bone a suture; the greater wing of the sphenoid bone participates in the formation of the anterior end of the squamosal suture
stylohyoid ligament the ligament that connects the styloid process with the lesser horn of the hyoid bone a syndesmosis; paired; a remnant of the mesenchymal core of the second pharyngeal arch (Reichert's cartilage)
stylomandibular ligament the ligament that connects the styloid process with the angle of the mandible paired; a thickening of the parotid fascia
temporomandibular joint the articulation between the head of the condylar process of the mandible and the mandibular fossa of the temporal bone a synovial hinge joint; it is separated into two joint spaces by an intracapsular fibrous articular disc; gliding action occurs superior to the articular disc and hinge action occurs inferior to the disc


Joints and Ligaments of the Thorax - Listed Alphabetically

Joint or ligament Description Notes
costal cartilage the cartilage that caps the medial end of the rib costal cartilages of ribs 1-7 connect to the sternum; costal cartilages of ribs 8-10 connect to the costal cartilage of rib 7; costal cartilages of ribs 11 & 12 do not articulate anteriorly but end in the muscles of the abdominal wall
radiate sternocostal ligaments ligaments that reinforce the sternocostal joint capsule these ligaments connect the costal cartilages of ribs 1-7 with the sternum on both the anterior and posterior surfaces of the sternocostal articulation
sternal angle the angle formed by the articulation between the manubrium and the body of the sternum a synchondrosis; the cartilage within this joint usually does not become ossified until old age; the angle formed by this articulation is also called the angle of Louis; the sternal angle marks the level of the second costal cartilage from which all other ribs are counted
sternocostal joints the articulations that connect the costal cartilages with the sternum a synchondrosis (rib 1) or synovial joints (ribs 2-10); sternocostal synovial joints involving ribs 2-7 contain thin joint capsules; interchondral joints involving ribs 8-10 have simple gliding synovial articulations; radiate sternocostal ligaments reinforce the sternocostal articulations
xiphisternal joint the articulation that connects the xiphoid process with the body of the sternum a synchondrosis; the cartilage within this joint usually becomes ossified in old age; the xiphisternal joint marks the inferior extent of the thoracic cavity


Joints and Ligaments of the Abdomen - Listed Alphabetically

Joint or ligament Description Notes
inguinal ligament the ligament that connects the anterior superior iliac spine with the pubic tubercle the inguinal ligament is a specialization of the inferior border of the external abdominal oblique aponeurosis; it is the site of origin for a part of the internal abdominal oblique muscle and for a part of the transversus abdominis muscle; also known as: Poupart's ligament
lacunar ligament an extension of the medial end of the inguinal ligament which connects the pubic tubercle with the pecten of the pubis the lacunar ligament is a flattened portion of the aponeurosis of the external abdominal oblique m. that projects posteriorly from the pubic tubercle; it forms the medial border of the femoral ring and the floor of the inguinal canal at the superficial inguinal ring
pectineal ligament a thickening of fascia on the pecten of the pubis the pectineal ligament looks like an extension of the lacunar ligament along the surface of the pectineal line; also known as: Cooper's ligament (note: Cooper's ligaments are also found in the breast)


Joints and Ligaments of the Pelvis and Perineum - Listed Alphabetically

Joint or ligament Description Notes
iliolumbar ligament a ligament that connects the transverse process of the L5 vertebra to the iliac crest the iliolumbar ligament stabilizes the lumbosacral joint
lumbosacral joint the articulation between the L5 vertebral body and the body of the first sacral segment a symphysis; this articulation is characterized by all of the features of a typical intervertebral articulation which include: an intervertebral disk, anterior and posterior longitudinal ligaments, synovial joints between articular processes, ligamenta flava, interspinal and supraspinal ligaments; a strong iliolumbar ligament strengthens this joint
pubic symphysis the midline joint uniting the superior rami of the two pubic bones a symphysis; a fibrocartilage interpubic disk unites the bones; the subpubic angle in the female is greater than the subpubic angle in the male
sacroiliac joint the articulation between the ala of the sacrum and the auricular surface of the ilium a synovial joint; the fibrous articular capsule is thickened dorsally and ventrally to form the sacroiliac ligaments; because of the interlocking nature of the joint surfaces and the strong sacroiliac ligaments, only limited movement is permitted at the sacroiliac joint
sacrospinous ligament the ligament that connects the ischial spine to the lateral surface of the sacrum and coccyx together with the sacrotuberous ligament, it converts the greater and lesser sciatic notches into greater and lesser sciatic foramina
sacrotuberous ligament the ligament that connects the ischial tuberosity to the lateral surface of the sacrum and coccyx together with sacrospinous ligament, it converts the greater and lesser sciatic notches into greater and lesser sciatic foramina


Joints and Ligaments of the Lower Limb - Listed Alphabetically

Joint or ligament Description Notes
acetabular labrum a fibrocartilage rim around the acetabulum the acetabular labrum deepens the acetabulum; it cups around the head of the femur and holds it firmly in the acetabulum
ankle joint the articulation between the distal tibia, the medial malleolus of the tibia, the lateral malleolus of the fibula and the talus a synovial hinge joint; the ankle is reinforced by the deltoid ligament (anterior tibiotalar, tibionavicular, tibiocalcaneal, posterior tibiotalar parts), the anterior talofibular lig., the calcaneofibular lig. and the posterior talofibular lig.; because of the shape of the talus, the ankle is most stable when the foot is dorsiflexed; the ankle is often injured when the foot is plantar flexed
anterior cruciate ligament a ligament connecting the anterior aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia with the medial surface of the lateral femoral condyle an intracapsular ligament located within the fibrous joint capsule of the knee but external to the synovial cavity of the knee; the anterior cruciate ligament limits the anterior movement of the tibia relative to the femur in all positions of joint movement; clipping-type injuries tear the anterior cruciate ligament because the leg is forced anteriorly relative to the femur which places great stress on the anterior cruciate ligament
anterior talofibular ligament a ligament that connects the lateral malleolus of the fibula with the anterolateral surface of the talus it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
anterior tibiofibular ligament the ligament that connects the distal ends of the tibia and the fibula anteriorly this ligament reinforces the tibiofibular syndesmosis (at the distal ends of these bones)
anterior tibiotalar ligament part of the deltoid ligament connecting the medial malleolus of the tibia with the talus it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
calcaneofibular ligament a ligament that connects the lateral malleolus of the fibula with the calcaneus it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
deltoid ligament the ligament that connects the medial malleolus of the tibia with the talus, navicular and calcaneus the deltoid ligament reinforces the ankle joint; it has the shape of the Greek letter delta, hence its name; it has four parts (from anterior to posterior): anterior tibiotalar lig., tibionavicular lig., tibiocalcaneal lig., posterior tibiotalar lig.
fibular collateral ligament the collateral ligament of the knee that connects the lateral epicondyle of the femur with the head of the fibula an extracapsular ligament, not part of the fibrous capsule of the knee; the fibular collateral ligament passes superficial to the tendon of origin of the popliteus m.
hip joint the articulation between the os coxae and the head of the femur a synovial ball and socket joint; it is reinforced by capsular ligaments (iliofemoral, pubofemoral, ischiofemoral, zona orbicularis); the fibers of the articular capsule become taut on hip extension and lax on hip flexion; dislocation injuries of the hip are most common when the hip is flexed (sitting in a car seat during an impact that causes the knees to strike the dash board, for example)
iliofemoral ligament the ligament reinforcing the anterior surface of the articular capsule of the hip joint the iliofemoral ligament is shaped like an inverted "Y"; it connects the anterior inferior iliac spine to the anterior surface of the intertrochanteric line of the femur; also known as: ligament of Bigelow
infrapatellar bursa, deep the bursa lying between the patellar ligament and the tibia synovial membrane, the deep infrapatellar bursa reduces friction between the patellar ligament and the tibia
infrapatellar bursa, superficial a subcutaneous bursa overlying the patellar ligament synovial membrane
interosseous ligaments of the foot ligaments that reinforce intertarsal (gliding) synovial joints they connect adjacent tarsal bones; they are named for the two bones that they connect and whether they are located on the dorsal or plantar surface of those bones
interosseous membrane of the leg the membrane that connects the interosseous borders of the shafts of the tibia and fibula a syndesmosis
interphalangeal joints the articulations between the proximal and middle phalanges (proximal interphalangeal joint, abbreviated PIP) or the middle and distal phalanges (distal interphalangeal joint, abbreviated DIP) a synovial hinge joint; these joints are strengthened by medial and lateral collateral ligaments
ischiofemoral ligament the ligament reinforcing the posterior surface of the articular capsule of the hip joint the ischiofemoral ligament connects the body of the ischium to the posterior portion of the femoral neck
knee joint the articulation between the femoral condyles and the tibial condyles a synovial hinge joint; it is reinforced by intracapsular ligaments (anterior & posterior cruciate ligaments) and two types of collateral ligaments (capsular - tibial collateral ligament, and extracapsular - fibular collateral ligament); the medial and lateral menisci are contained within the joint capsule
lateral meniscus an intra-articular disc within the knee joint located between the lateral femoral condyle and the lateral tibial condyle fibrocartilage; it is attached to the coronary ligament and the intercondylar eminence of the tibia
ligament of the head of the femur an intracapsular ligament that attaches to the fovea of the head of the femur and to the acetabular fossa the ligament of the head of the femur contains a small artery (the a. of the ligament of the head of the femur) which supplies the femoral head; in fractures of the neck of the femur the retinacular aa. that course along the neck may be damaged, so that the artery to the head may be the only blood supply to the head and proximal neck
long plantar ligament a ligament that connects the plantar surface of the calcaneus, cuboid and the bases of the lateral 3 metatarsal bones a ligament that reinforces a complex set of intertarsal (gliding) synovial joints; the long plantar ligament supports the longitudinal arch of the foot
longitudinal arch of the foot the arch that passes from the calcaneus to the talus to the navicular to the cuneiforms to the metatarsal a series of plane synovial joints; the longitudinal arch of the foot is formed by the shapes of the metatarsal bones and is supported by the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament and many other small interosseous ligaments; the tendons of the tibialis anterior and tibialis posterior mm. also play a supporting role in maintaining the longitudinal arch of the foot
medial meniscus an intra-articular disc within the knee joint located between the medial femoral condyle and the medial tibial condyle fibrocartilage; it is attached to the tibial collateral ligament, coronary ligament and intercondylar eminence of the tibia; its attachment fo the tibial collateral ligament results in injury to the medial meniscus whenever the medial collateral ligament is injured
metatarsophalangeal joint the articulation between the head of a metatarsal and the base of a proximal phalanx a synovial condyloid (or ellipsoid) joint; it is strengthened by medial and lateral collateral ligaments; the joint has two planes of motion: flexion/extension and abduction/adduction which may be combined to yield circumduction
patellar ligament the tendon of insertion of the quadriceps femoris muscle the quadriceps femoris tendon connects the quadriceps femoris muscle group to the patella and the patellar ligament connects the patella to the tibial tuberosity; the patella is a sesamoid bone within the quadriceps femoris tendon
plantar calcaneocuboid ligament a ligament that connects the calcaneus with the cuboid on their plantar surfaces a ligament that reinforces a complex set of intertarsal (gliding) synovial joints; it supports the longitudinal arch of the foot; also known as: short plantar ligament
plantar calcaneonavicular ligament a ligament that connects the sustentaculum tali with the plantar surface of the navicular bone a ligament that reinforces a complex set of intertarsal (gliding) synovial joints; it supports the longitudinal arch of the foot; also known as: spring ligament
posterior cruciate ligament a ligament connecting the posterior aspect of the intercondylar eminence with the lateral surface of the medial femoral condyle an intracapsular ligament located within the fibrous joint capsule of the knee but external to the synovial cavity of the knee; the posterior cruciate ligament limits the posterior movement of the tibia relative to the femur in all positions of joint movement
posterior meniscofemoral ligament an intracapsular ligament that connects the posterior part of the lateral meniscus with the lateral surface of the medial femoral condyle may be absent
posterior talofibular ligament a ligament that connects the lateral malleolus of the fibula with the posterolateral surface of the talus it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
posterior tibiofibular ligament the ligament that connects the distal ends of the tibia and the fibula posteriorly this ligament reinforces the tibiofibular syndesmosis (at the distal ends of these bones)
posterior tibiotalar ligament part of the deltoid ligament connecting the medial malleolus of the tibia with the talus posteriorly it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
prepatellar bursa a subcutaneous bursa overlying the patella synovial membrane; inflammation of this bursa leads to the condition known as "housemaid's knee" (prepatellar bursitis), so named because housemaids at one time traumatized this bursa while scrubbing floors on their hands and knees
pubofemoral ligament the ligament reinforcing the medial surface of the articular capsule of the hip joint the pubofemoral ligament connects the pubic portion of the rim of the bony acetabulum to the medial surface of the femoral neck
suprapatellar bursa the superior extension of the synovial membrane of the knee joint it passes deep to the quadriceps femoris tendon; the suprapatellar bursa reduces friction between the quadriceps femoris tendon and the femur
tarsometatarsal joints the articulations between the distal row of tarsal bones and the proximal ends of the metatarsal bones gliding synovial joints; they are reinforced by dorsal and plantar ligaments which limit the motion between adjacent bones
tibial collateral ligament the collateral ligament of the knee joint connecting the medial epicondyle of the femur with the medial surface of the medial condyle of the tibia the tibial collateral ligament reinforces the medial surface of the articular capsule of the knee; it is attached to the medial meniscus which has clinical relevance - when the tibial collateral ligament tears in a clipping-type injury (knee abduction), the medial meniscus also tears
tibiocalcaneal ligament part of the deltoid ligament connecting the medial malleolus of the tibia with the sustentaculum tali it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
tibionavicular ligament part of the deltoid ligament connecting the medial malleolus of the tibia with the navicular it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
transverse acetabular ligament the ligament that spans the acetabular notch near the rim of the acetabulum the acetabular branch of the obturator artery enters the hip joint by passing beneath the transverse acetabular ligament; the artery of the ligament of the head of the femur is a branch of the acetabular a.
transverse arch of the foot the arch that passes through the distal row of tarsal bones a series of plane synovial joints; the transverse arch of the foot is supported by the shape of the tarsal bones, many small interosseous ligaments and the tendons of the fibularis longus m., tibialis anterior m. and tibialis posterior m.
zona orbicularis circularly oriented ligamentous fibers that reinforce the capsule of the hip joint the zona orbicularis fibers tend to constrict the fibrous joint capsule around the neck of the femur, helping to hold the head of the femur in the acetabulum


Some of the material presented in these tables is contained in the book:
MedCharts Anatomy by Thomas R. Gest and Jaye Schlesinger
Published by ILOC, Inc., New York. Copyright 1995.

The content of these tables has been edited for use in this course by Patrick W. Tank, Ph.D.
Copyright 2009, Department of Neurobiology and Developmental Sciences, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.
Unauthorized use is prohibited.




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