UAMS Department of Anatomy, Graduate Studies

Graduate Studies

at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Graduate Studies in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology

The Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology offers graduate training programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. A non-thesis M.S. is also offered. The objective of these programs is to prepare graduates for careers in teaching and research. Areas of faculty research specialization include various aspects of neuroscience and developmental and cell biology. The master's degree curriculum involves courses in gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy, and neuroscience. The departmental Ph.D. program emphasizes cell biology and/or neurobiology (neuroanatomy, neurohistology, neurophysiology, and neuropharmacology), according to the student's research interests. Graduate-level courses in more specialized areas complete the course of study, which may be tailored to meet the needs of individual students. The Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology also participates in an interdisciplinary neuroscience program at the University. This program involves faculty members in neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neuroimmunology, neuropharmacology, and neuroanatomy.

Programs of Study

The Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology offers graduate training programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. The objective of these programs is to prepare graduates for careers in teaching and research. Areas of faculty research specialization include various aspects of neuroscience and developmental and cell biology (for details see the Faculty and Their Research section). The Masters Degree curriculum involves courses in gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy and neuroscience. Further coursework and research is directed towards the Masters Thesis. There are focused research groups that offer specific courses to allow students to emphasize different areas in their Ph.D. program. The cell and developmental biology focus group allows an emphasis in course work and research in cell biology, developmental biology, cell physiology, molecular biology and biochemistry. The neuroscience research focus group emphasizes the study of neuroanatomy, neurohistology, neurophysiology and neurophamacology. It also participates in an interdisciplinary neuroscience program at the University. This program involves faculty in neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neuroimmunology, neuropharmacology and neuroanatomy. Graduate-level courses in more specialized areas complete the course of study, which may be tailored to meet the needs of individual students.

Research Facilities

The Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology occupies approximately 20,000 square feet of laboratory space. Additional research space for the department is housed in the Arkansas Cancer Research Center, the Biomedical Research Center, and the Barton Research Building. Extramural grant support for full-time faculty members in the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology totals more than $2.1 million for the 2002-03 academic year. A variety of equipment allows a breadth of research possibilities. Included are laboratories equipped for in vivo and in vitro electrophysiology, tissue culture, biochemistry, molecular biology, electron microscopy, and image analysis. In addition, the department occupies a 12,000-square-foot state-of-the-art teaching facility for gross anatomy. This facility may be viewed at the department Web site, listed below. The library of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences contains approximately 175,000 volumes and receives 1,381 current periodicals.

Financial Aid

Teaching and research assistantships are available on a competitive basis. The stipend is $18,500, and tuition is paid for graduate assistants.

Cost of Study

Tuition and fees for the 2002-03 year are $1950 per semester for Arkansas residents and $4190 per semester for out-of-state students.

Living and Housing Costs

The University maintains a residence hall on campus that provides accommodations varying in cost from $170 per month for a double room to $465 per month for a one-bedroom apartment. Dining facilities are available in the cafeteria of the University Hospital. Reasonably priced rooms, apartments, and houses are available nearby.

Student Group

There are 1,936 students enrolled in the various professional schools (Medicine, Pharmacy, Health Related Professions, and Nursing) at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. There are 92 students in the basic science departments of the Graduate School. A campuswide student association offers social and collegial relationships with other graduate students.

Location

Metropolitan Little Rock, which is located at the geographic center of Arkansas, has a population of approximately 300,000. It is the state capital and is served by seven airlines and by the interstate highway system. The Ouachita, Ozark, and Boston mountains are nearby. There are many lakes, rivers, and streams within driving distance. The city provides cultural opportunities, including the Arkansas Arts Center, a symphony orchestra, an opera company, several professional theater companies, and a zoo. There are minor-league baseball and hockey teams, and the University of Arkansas football team plays some of its home games in Little Rock.

The University

The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences belongs to the University of Arkansas System. The Graduate School is part of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, an institution that also includes colleges of medicine, public health, pharmacy, nursing, and health-related professions. Other units of the University of Arkansas System that are located in Little Rock include the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, the School of Law, and the Graduate School of Social Work.

The Community:

Metropolitan Little Rock located at the geographic center of Arkansas, has a population of approximately 300,000. It is the state capitol and is served by seven airlines. The Ouachita, Ozark, and Boston Mountains are nearby. There are many lakes, rivers, and streams within driving distance. The city provides cultural opportunities, including the Arkansas Arts Center, a symphony orchestra, an opera company, several professional theater companies, and a zoo. There is a minor-league baseball team, and the University of Arkansas football team plays some of its home games in Little Rock. There are 1,850 students enrolled in the various professional colleges (Medicine, Pharmacy, Health Related Professions, and Nursing) at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. There are 115 students in the basic science departments of the Graduate School. A campus-wide student association offers social and collegial relationships with other graduate students. Other units of the University of Arkansas system that are located in Little Rock include the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, the School of Law, and the Graduate School of Social Work.

Applying

The Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology seeks applicants who have a strong undergraduate background in the biological and physical sciences. Score reports on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination are required of all applicants, as are transcripts of all academic records and three letters of recommendation. Interviews can be arranged at any time, and visits are encouraged. Prospective students should apply as early as possible in the academic year preceding the desired year of entrance. For further information and application forms for admission and financial aid, students should write to the address below.

Correspondence and Information

Dr. Donald Cave
Director of Graduate Studies
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, SLOT 510
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
4301 West Markham Street
Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-7199
E-mail: cavedonald@exchange.uams.edu
World Wide Web: http://anatomy.uams.edu

The Faculty and their research:

The main, but not exclusive, research efforts of the Department involve solving clinically relevant problems within the field of neuroscience. A wide variety of techniques are used on several broad-based research projects whose main emphasis is directed towards understanding the nervous system. Investigations are currently underway to reveal the fundamental concepts associated with the normal development of the neurons, the various neuronal supportive cells (glia), and cell surface receptors within the vertebrate nervous system. Experiments include morphological and electrophysiological changes which occur during development and injury.

Anatomy Faculty and Their Research Interests

Click on the faculty member's name for additional information
Dr. Childs Gwen V. Childs, Ph.D., Chair
Research Interest: Regulation of specific anterior pituitary cells by neuroendocrine peptides and growth factors. (profile)
Dr. Benes Helen Benes, Ph.D.
Research interest: Insect models for studies of development and aging; sex-specific gene activity in larval mosquitoes; role of glutathione S-transferases in preventing oxidative damage.

Dr. Barger Steven W. Barger, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Neuronal death caused by pathological insults (especially excitotoxicity) and the protection against these insults afforded by changes in gene expression.
Dr. Burns E. Robert Burns, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Experimental oncology, cell kinetics, chronochemotherapy.

Dr. Cave M. Donald Cave, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Development of diagnostic molecular probes for microbial pathogens.

Dr. Chang Jason Y. Chang, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Neuronal programmed cell death, neurotoxicity of cholesterol oxides.
Dr. Davies David L. Davies, Ph.D.
Research Interest: The pathogenesis of brain damage following exposure to ethanol.

Dr. Drew Paul D. Drew, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Neuroimmunolgy; Regulation of Gene Expression; Cytokine Signalling; Inflammation (Multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease); Cancer Biology

Dr. Garcia-Rill Edgar Garcia-Rill, Ph.D.
Disorders of the reticular activating system; restitution of locomotor function after spinal cord injury.
Dr. GilmoreShirley Ann Gilmore, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Spinal cord development and maturation; regeneration and repair in the spinal cord
Dr. Griffin W. Sue T. Griffin, Ph.D.

Dr. Houlé John D. Houlé, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Structure and functional repair of the injured spinal cord

Dr. Hubert; Walter G. Hubert, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Pathogenesis of oncogenic human papillomaviruses, regulation of viral replication

Dr. Kane Cynthia J.M. Kane, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Peptide growth factor regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation in the nervous system during normal development, upon injury, or in neurodegenerative diseases.

Dr. Kielian Tammy L. Kielian, Ph.D.
Research Interest: The study of the pathogenesis and immune responses elicited by Staphylococcus aureus in the central nervous system (CNS) and the role of macrophages in the establishment and persistence of gliomas.

Dr. MacNicol Angus M. MacNicol, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Signal transduction, vertebrate development, cancer biology, mRNA translation, neuronal differentiation and function.

Dr. Mendelson Bruce Mendelson, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Disorders of the neuromuscular system. Restoration of function following central or peripheral nervous system pathology.

Dr. Mrak Robert E. Mrak, Ph.D., M.D.
Research Interest: Neuropathology and neurochemistry.

Dr. Newton Bruce W. Newton, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Hormone and target regulation of sexually dimorphic spinal nuclei, development of spinal autonomic nervous system.

Dr. Phelan Kevin Phelan, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Regulation of Synaptic Transmission and Neuronal-Glial Interactions

Dr. Sanderson Ralph D. Sanderson, Ph.D.
Research interest: Cell surface receptors for extracellular matrix; molecular structure, function and role of proteoglycans in tumor metastisis.

Dr. Sims Terry Sims, Ph.D.
Research interest: Development of the nervous system; regeneration following injury to the central nervous system; aging ofthe central nervous system.

Dr. Skinner Robert D. Skinner, Ph.D.
Research interest: Locomotion pattern generators in the spinal cord; midlatency auditory evoked potential and restoring the inhibition of this potential preventing the development of post-traumatic stress disorder following a traumatic event.
Dr. Tank Patrick W. Tank, Ph.D.
Research Interest: Pattern formation during limb development and regeneration.



Return to the Anatomy home page...


Send a message to Dr. Patrick Tank, System Administrator...



Powered by:  Apple Internet Server Solution.