UAMS Gross Anatomy

Gross Anatomy


Leg and Dorsum of the Foot


Anatomy Tables for Today's Topic

Bones of the Leg and Foot
Muscles of the Leg and Dorsum of Foot
Nerves of the Leg and Dorsum of Foot
Arteries of the Leg and Dorsum of Foot
Veins of the Leg and Dorsum of Foot
Topographic Anatomy
Lymphatics
Joints

Bones of the Leg and Foot

Bone Structure Description Notes
tibia   the bone on the medial side of the leg the tibia is the weight-bearing bone of the leg
  medial condyle the heavy prominence on the medial side of the proximal end of the tibia the medial condyle articulates with the medial condyle of the femur; it is larger than the lateral condyle of the tibia
lateral condyle the heavy prominence on the lateral side of the proximal end of the tibia the lateral condyle articulates with the lateral condyle of the femur and with the head of the fibula
intercondylar eminence the ridge of bone on the proximal end of the tibia that projects between the condyles the intercondylar eminence has a medial and a lateral tubercle; it is the attachment site for the cruciate ligaments, medial meniscus and lateral meniscus
tibial tuberosity the roughened protuberance on the anterior surface of the tibia located just distal to the condyles it is the attachment site of the patellar ligament, which represents the insertion of the quadriceps femoris tendon
body the long, robust shaft of the tibia the medial surface of the body of the tibia is subcutaneous throughout its length; when the shin is painfully bumped, the nerve endings are stimulated in the periosteum covering the body of the tibia
interosseous border the sharp ridge that runs longitudinally along the junction of the lateral surface and the posterior surface of the tibia the interosseous membrane attaches to the interosseous border of the tibia
soleal line a ridge of bone that descends obliquely from lateral to medial on the posterior surface of the tibia it is the site of origin of the soleus m.
medial malleolus the large bony prominence on the medial side of the ankle the medial malleolus of the tibia forms the medial side of the ankle joint; it articulates with the medial surface of the talus
fibula   the slender bone on the lateral side of the leg the fibula is not a weight-bearing bone, it is a muscle attachment bone
  head the enlarged proximal end of the fibula it articulates with the lateral condyle of tibia; the fibular collateral ligament of the knee attaches to the head of the fibula
neck the constricted portion of the fibula located just inferior to the head fractures of the neck of the fibula can injure the common fibular n.
body the long slender shaft of the fibula the interosseous membrane attaches to the entire length of the interosseous border of the fibula
interosseous border the sharp ridge that runs longitudinally along the medial surface of the fibula the interosseous membrane attaches to the interosseous border of the fibula
lateral malleolus the enlarged distal end of the fibula the lateral malleolus of the fibula forms the lateral side of the ankle joint; it articulates with the lateral surface of the talus; forcible lateral displacement of the foot can cause the fibula to fracture superior to the lateral malleolus, a condition called a Pott's fracture
tarsal bones   the bones of the ankle there are seven tarsal bones: talus, calcaneus, navicular, medial cuneiform, intermediate cuneiform, lateral cuneiform, cuboid
talus   the most proximal of the tarsal bones the talus articulates with the medial malleolus of the tibia and the lateral malleolus of the fibula to form the ankle mortise joint
  body the proximal part of the talus its superior (trochlear) part participates in the ankle joint and its inferior part articulates with the calcaneus
  trochlea the superior portion of the body of the talus that lies between the two malleoli it has a smooth articular surface; it participates in the formation of the ankle joint
head the portion of the talus that projects anteriorly it articulates with the navicular bone
neck the constricted part of the talus located proximal to the head
calcaneus   the tarsal bone which forms the heel it is the largest and strongest bone in the foot; a fracture of the calcaneus which separates the tuberosity from the body can be a debilitating injury
  calcaneal tuberosity the posterior roughened area of the calcaneus which contacts the ground during weight-bearing it is the insertion site of the calcaneal (Achilles') tendon
sustentaculum tali the shelf-like medial projection of bone located inferior to the medial malleolus it is a shelf of bone that articulates with and supports the talus; it is grooved inferiorly by the tendon of the flexor hallucis longus m.
navicular   the tarsal bone located distal to the talus and proximal to the three cuneiform bones it articulates with the head of the talus and all three cuneiform bones; it is the attachment site for an important ligament (plantar calcaneonavicular or "spring" ligament) that supports the medial longitudinal arch of the foot
cuneiform, medial   the most medial bone in the distal row of tarsal bones the cuneiform bones articulate with the navicular bone proximally and the bases of the metatarsal bones distally
cuneiform, middle the intermediate bone of the three cuneiform bones the cuneiform bones articulate with the navicular bone proximally and the bases of the metatarsal bones distally
cuneiform, lateral the bone that is located between the middle cuneiform and the cuboid bone the cuneiform bones articulate with the navicular bone proximally and the bases of the metatarsal bones distally
cuboid   the most lateral bone in the distal row of tarsal bones the cuboid bone articulates with the calcaneus proximally and the fourth and fifth metatarsal bones distally
metatarsals   the bones located between the tarsal bones and the phalanges there are five metatarsal bones in the foot
base the proximal end of the metatarsal it articulates with the distal row of tarsal bones
body the slender shaft of the metatarsal it is also known as the diaphysis
head the rounded distal end of the metatarsal it articulates with the proximal phalanx of the corresponding digit
phalanx (phalanges)   the distal two or three bones in the digits of the foot there are a total of 14 phalanges in the foot; the great toe has two phalanges (proximal and distal) and each of the other four toes has three phalanges (proximal, middle and distal); phalanx means "line of soldiers"
base the proximal end of the phalanx the base of the proximal phalanx articulates with the head of the corresponding metatarsal bone; the base of the middle or distal phalanx articulates with the head of the next most proximal phalanx
body the slender shaft of the phalanx also known as the diaphysis; the body of the distal phalanx is very short
head the distal end of the phalanx the proximal, middle and distal phalanges each have a head; the head of a proximal or middle phalanx articulates with the base of the next most distal phalanx

Muscles of the Leg and Dorsum of Foot

Muscle Origin Insertion Action Innervation Artery Notes
extensor digitorum brevis superolateral surface of the calcaneus extensor expansion of toes 1-4 extends toes 1-4 deep fibular (peroneal) nerve dorsalis pedis a. the part of the extensor digitorum brevis that goes to the great toe is called the extensor hallucis brevis m.
extensor digitorum longus lateral condyle of the tibia, anterior surface of the fibula, lateral portion of the interosseous membrane dorsum of the lateral 4 toes via extensor expansions (central slip inserts on base of middle phalanx, lateral slips on base of distal phalanx) extends the metatarsophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints of the lateral 4 toes deep fibular (peroneal) nerve anterior tibial a. one of the muscles involved in anterior compartment syndrome
extensor hallucis brevis superolateral surface of the calcaneus dorsum of base of proximal phalanx of the great toe extends the great toe deep fibular (peroneal) nerve dorsalis pedis a. usually considered to be the medial-most part of the extensor digitorum brevis m.
extensor hallucis longus middle half of the anterior surface of the fibula and the interosseous membrane base of the distal phalanx of the great toe extends the metatarsophalangeal interphalangeal joints of the great toe deep fibular (peroneal) nerve anterior tibial a. one of the muscles involved in anterior compartment syndrome
fibularis (peroneus) brevis lower one third of the lateral surface of the fibula tuberosity of the base of the 5th metatarsal extends (plantar flexes) and everts the foot superficial fibular (peroneal) nerve fibular (peroneal) a. stress fracture of the base of the 5th metatarsal bone is a common runner's injury
fibularis (peroneus) longus upper two/thirds of the lateral surface of the fibula after crossing the plantar surface of the foot deep to the intrinsic muscles, it inserts on the medial cuneiform and the base of the 1st metatarsal bone extends (plantar flexes) and everts the foot superficial fibular (peroneal) nerve fibular (peroneal) a. fibularis longus lies superficial to the fibularis brevis m. in the lateral compartment of the leg
fibularis (peroneus) tertius distal part of the anterior surface of the fibula dorsum of the shaft of the 5th metatarsal bone everts the foot deep fibular (peroneal) nerve anterior tibial a. fibularis tertius is in the anterior compartment of the leg, not the lateral compartment (which contains fibularis longus and brevis)
flexor digitorum longus middle half of the posterior surface of the tibia bases of the distal phalanges of digits 2-5 flexes the metatarsophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints of digits 2-5; plantar flexes the foot tibial nerve tibial a. flexor digitorum longus in the leg is equivalent to the flexor digitorum profundus m. of the arm
flexor hallucis longus lower 2/3 of the posterior surface of the fibula base of the distal phalanx of the great toe flexes the metatarsophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints of the great toe; plantar flexes the foot tibial nerve fibular (peroneal) a. and tibial a. flexor hallucis longus is very important in the "push off" part of the normal gait
gastrocnemius femur; medial head: above the medial femoral condyle; lateral head: above the lateral femoral condyle dorsum of the calcaneus via the calcaneal (Achilles') tendon flexes leg; plantar flexes foot tibial nerve sural aa. (from the popliteal a.), posterior tibial a. the calcaneal tendon of the gastrocnemius and soleus is the thickest and strongest tendon in the body
peroneus mm. (SEE fibularis mm.)peroneus is the old terminology used for fibularis mm.
plantaris above the lateral femoral condyle (above the lateral head of gastrocnemius) dorsum of the calcaneus medial to the calcaneal tendon flexes the leg; plantar flexes the foot tibial nerve popliteal a. plantaris has a long slender tendon that is equivalent to the tendon of the palmaris longus m. of the arm; its tendon is often called the "freshman nerve" because it is often misidentified by the freshman medical student
popliteus lateral condyle of the femur posterior surface of the tibia above soleal line flexes and rotates the leg medially (with the foot planted, it rotates the thigh laterally) tibial nerve popliteal a. has a round tendon of origin; popliteus unlocks the knee joint to initiate flexion of the leg
soleus posterior surface of head and upper shaft of the fibula, soleal line of the tibia dorsum of the calcaneus via the calcaneal (Achilles') tendon plantar flexes the foot tibial nerve posterior tibial a. soleus, gastrocnemius, and plantaris mm. are sometimes called the triceps surae muscle
tibialis anterior lateral tibial condyle and the upper lateral surface of the tibia medial surface of the medial cuneiform and the 1st metatarsal dorsiflexes and inverts the foot deep fibular (peroneal) nerve anterior tibial a. acts as both an antagonist (dorsiflexion/plantar flexion) and a synergist (inversion) of the tibialis posterior m.
tibialis posterior interosseous membrane, posteromedial surface of the fibula, posterolateral surface of the tibia tuberosity of the navicular and medial cuneiform, metatarsals 2-4 plantar flexes the foot; inverts the foot tibial nerve fibular (peroneal) a. and tibial a. acts as both an antagonist (dorsiflexion/plantar flexion) and a synergist (inversion) of the tibialis anterior m.

Nerves of the Leg and Dorsum of Foot

Nerve Source Branches Motor Sensory Notes
fibular, common sciatic n. lateral sural cutaneous n., superficial and deep fibular nn. superficial fibular n.: muscles of the lateral compartment of the leg (fibularis longus and brevis mm.); deep fibular n.: muscles of the anterior compartment of the leg (tibialis anterior m., extensor hallucis longus m., extensor digitorum longus m., fibularis tertius m.) and muscles of the dorsum of the foot (extensor digitorum brevis m.and extensor hallucis brevis m.) superficial fibular n.: distal 1/3 of the anterior surface of the leg, dorsum of the foot excluding the web between the great toe and the 2nd toe and distal interphalangeal segments of all toes; deep fibular n.: skin of the web between the great toe and the 2nd toe "peroneal" is old terminology which has been replaced by "fibular"
fibular, deep common fibular n. one proper digital br. muscles of the anterior compartment of the leg (tibialis anterior m., extensor hallucis longus m., extensor digitorum longus m., fibularis tertius m.) and muscles of the dorsum of the foot (extensor digitorum brevis m.and extensor hallucis brevis m.) skin of the web between the great toe and the 2nd toe "peroneal" is old terminology which has been replaced by "fibular"; anterior compartment syndrome - trauma to the anterior side of the leg can result in pressure buildup in the anterior compartment (from swelling or bleeding) that can damage the deep fibular n., resulting in "foot drop"
fibular, superficial common fibular n. medial dorsal cutaneous n. to the medial side of the foot; dorsal digital nn. to the lateral 3 toes muscles of the lateral compartment of the leg (fibularis longus and brevis mm.) distal 1/3 of the anterior surface of the leg; dorsum of the foot excluding the skin of the web between the great toe and the 2nd toe and the distal interphalangeal segments of all toes "peroneal" is old terminology which has been replaced by "fibular"; the nail beds are supplied by nerves from the plantar surface of the foot
peroneal, common SEE: fibular, common . . . "peroneal" is old terminology which has been replaced by fibular
peroneal, deep SEE: fibular, deep . . . "peroneal" is old terminology which has been replaced by fibular
peroneal, superficial SEE: fibular, superficial . . . "peroneal" is old terminology which has been replaced by fibular
saphenous femoral n. infrapatellar br. none skin of the medial side of the leg and medial side of the foot saphenous n. travels with the great saphenous v.; it does not pass through the adductor hiatus at the knee; it passes anterior to the medial malleolus at the ankle
sciatic n. sacral plexus (ventral primary rami of spinal nerves L4-L5 and S1-S3) tibial n., common fibular (peroneal) n. semitendinosus m., semimembranosus m., biceps femoris m., ischioconylar part of the adductor magnus m.; its branches supply all muscles of the leg and foot its branches supply the skin of the leg and foot (excluding the medial side of leg & foot) sciatic n. is composed of tibial and common fibular divisions; branches to muscles come from one of the two divisions, so that the sciatic n. is considered to have no direct muscular brs., only 2 terminal brs.
sural formed by the union of the fibular communicating br. of the lateral sural cutaneous n. and the medial sural cutaneous nn. lateral calcaneal brs., lateral dorsal cutaneous n. of the foot none skin of the posterior surface of the lower leg; skin of the lateral side of the foot sural n. courses posterior to the lateral malleolus at the ankle with the lesser saphenous v.
sural cutaneous, lateral common fibular n. fibular communicating br. none skin of the lateral side of the leg contains postganglionic sympathetic axons for supply of sweat glands, arrector pili mm. and blood vessels
sural cutaneous, medial tibial n. no named branches none skin of the posterior surface of the leg; skin of the lateral side of the foot unites with fibular communicating br. to form the sural n.
sciaticmedial sural cutaneous, medial calcaneal brs., medial & lateral plantar nn.semimembranosus, semitendinosus, long head of biceps femoris, ischiocondylar portion of adductor magnus; mm. of superficial and deep posterior compartments of leg (gastrocnemius, soleus, plantaris, tibialis posterior, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus); muscles of plantar side of the foot
tibial sciatic n. medial sural cutaneous n., medial calcaneal brs., medial and lateral plantar nn. semimembranosus m., semitendinosus m., long head of biceps femoris m., ischiocondylar portion of adductor magnus m.; mm. of the superficial and deep posterior compartments of the leg (gastrocnemius m., soleus m., plantaris m., tibialis posterior m., flexor hallucis longus m., flexor digitorum longus m.); muscles of the plantar side of the foot skin of the plantar surface of the foot and toes; skin of the dorsal surface of the distal toes (nail bed region) tibial n. is the larger of the two divisions of the sciatic n.

Arteries of the Leg

Artery Source Branches Supply to Notes
dorsalis pedisanterior tibial a.dorsal metatarsal (3)dorsum of foot, excluding pollex & distal phalangeal segments of digitsanastomoses with lateral tarsal a.
arcuate dorsalis pedis a. dorsal metatarsal aa. (3) dorsum of the foot, excluding the pollex and the distal phalangeal segments of the digits arcuate a. anastomoses with the lateral tarsal a.
circumflex fibular anterior tibial unnamed muscular branches proximal portion of lateral leg arises from the tibial a. before the tibial a. pierces the interosseous membrane
dorsalis pedis anterior tibial a. lateral tarsal a., medial tarsal a., arcuate a., 1st dorsal metatarsal a., deep plantar a. dorsal aspect of the foot; dorsalis pedis a. anastomoses with the plantar arterial arch; the anterior tibial artery continues as the dorsalis pedis - the name change occurs at the level of the ankle
fibular posterior tibial a. nutrient br., lateral malleolar a., communicating br., perforating br. muscles and fascia of the lateral leg ankle fibular a. anastomoses at the ankle with the anterior and posterior tibial aa.; also known as: peroneal a.
genicular, descending femoral a. saphenous br., articular brs. skin and superficial structures of the medial aspect of the knee and upper leg descending genicular a. anastomoses with the genicular brs. of the popliteal a.
genicular, inferior lateral popliteal a. no named branches lateral aspect of the knee inferior lateral genicular a. anastomoses with the other genicular brs. of the popliteal a., circumflex fibular a. and anterior tibial recurrent a. to form the genicular anastomosis
genicular, inferior medial popliteal a. no named branches medial aspect of the knee inferior medial genicular a. anastomoses with the other genicular brs. of the popliteal a., circumflex fibular a. and anterior tibial recurrent a. to form the genicular anastomosis
genicular, middle popliteal a. no named branches cruciate ligaments and deep structures of the knee middle genicular a. anastomoses with the other genicular brs. of the popliteal a., circumflex fibular a. and anterior tibial recurrent a. to form the genicular anastomosis
genicular, superior lateral popliteal a. no named branches lateral aspect of knee superior lateral genicular a. anastomoses with the other genicular brs. of the popliteal a., circumflex fibular a. and anterior tibial recurrent a. to form the genicular anastomosis
genicular, superior medial popliteal a. no named branches medial aspect of knee superior medial genicular a. anastomoses with the other genicular brs. of the popliteal a., circumflex fibular a. and anterior tibial recurrent a. to form the genicular anastomosis
metatarsal, dorsal dorsalis pedis (1st), arcuate (2nd-4th) dorsal digital aa. (2) dorsum of digits, excluding the distal phalangeal segment each dorsal metatarsal a. gives off a perforating br. that anastomoses with the plantar arterial arch
popliteal femoral a. anterior tibial a., posterior tibial a., 5 genicular brs. knee, leg and foot the popliteal a. is the continuation of the femoral a., the name change occurs at the adductor hiatus
recurrent, anterior tibial anterior tibial a. no named branches anterior side of the knee and adjacent muscles anterior tibial recurrent a. anastomoses with the genicular aa. to participate in the formation of the genicular anastomosis
recurrent, posterior tibial anterior tibial a. no named branches posterior knee, popliteus m. anastomoses with the other genicular aa. to participate in the formation of the genicular anastomosis
sural popliteal a. unnamed muscular aa. gastrocnemius m., soleus m., plantaris m. sural aa. are often confused with the inferior genicular aa. during dissection
tarsal, lateral dorsalis pedis a. no named branches tarsal bones and joints of the lateral foot lateral tarsal a. anastomoses with the arcuate a.
tarsal, medial dorsalis pedis a. no named branches tarsal bones and joints of the medial side of the foot medial tarsal aa. are 2-3 in number; they anastomose with the medial malleolar aa.
tibial, anterior popliteal a. anterior tibial recurrent a., posterior tibial recurrent a., anterior malleolar a., medial malleolar a., lateral malleolar a., dorsalis pedis a. anterior leg; dorsum of foot and deep foot anterior tibial a. becomes continuous with the dorsalis pedis a.; the name change occurs at the level of the ankle joint
tibial, posterior popliteal a. fibular a. (peroneal), circumflex fibular a., nutrient a. of the tibia, communicating br., posterior medial malleolar brs., medial calcaneal brs., lateral plantar a., medial plantar a. posterior and lateral leg, plantar aspect of the foot posterior tibial a. is the direct continuation of the popliteal a. the name change occurs at the inferior border of the popliteus m. where the popliteal a. bifurcates; the tibial a. bifurcates on the medial side of the foot to give rise to the medial plantar a. and lateral plantar a.

Veins of the Leg and Dorsum of Foot

Vein Tributaries Drains Into Regions Drained Notes
dorsal venous arch of the foot dorsal digital vv. and dorsal metatarsal vv. great saphenous v. medially, small saphenous v. laterally dorsum of the digits and the superficial structures of the dorsum of the foot dorsal venous arch is visible through the thin skin on the dorsum of the foot
greater saphenous v. medial end of dorsal venous arch of foot, perforating communications with deep veins, superficial epigastric v., superficial circumflex iliac v., superficial external pudendal v. femoral v. skin and superficial fascia of the medial side of the foot and leg; skin and superficial fascia of most of the thigh; lower abdominal wall; perineal region greater saphenous v. is frequently used as graft material in coronary bypass surgery
lesser saphenous v. lateral end of the dorsal venous arch of foot popliteal v. skin and superficial fascia of the lateral side of the foot and leg passes deeply into the popliteal fossa
metatarsal, dorsal of the foot dorsal digital vv. dorsal venous arch of the foot dorsal aspects of the digits of the foot dorsal metatarsal v. drains the adjacent sides of two digits

Topographic Anatomy

Structure/Space Description/Boundaries Significance
anterior compartment, leg a connective tissue compartment that contains muscles that dorsiflex the ankle; its boundaries are: tibia, fibula, interosseous membrane, anterior intermuscular septum anterior compartment of the leg contains the tibialis anterior m., extensor hallucis longus m., extensor digitorum longus m., fibularis tertius m.; it also contains the anterior tibial a. and the deep fibular n.; also known as: extensor compartment of the leg
fascia, crural deep fascia forming a tubular investment of the leg crural fascia is continuous with the fascia lata at the level of the knee; it is connected to the fibula by the anterior and posterior intermuscular septa; crural fascia is thickened near the ankle to form the extensor and flexor retinacula
lateral compartment, leg a connective tissue compartment that contains the muscles that evert the ankle joint; its boundaries are: anterior, lateral and medial - crural fascia; posterior - anterior and posterior intermuscular septa, fibula lateral compartment of the leg contains: fibularis longus m., fibularis brevis m.; superficial fibular n.; also known as: evertor compartment of the leg
posterior compartment , leg a connective tissue compartment that contains the muscles that plantar flex the ankle joint; its boundaries are: anterior - tibia, fibula and interosseous membrane; lateral, medial and posterior - crural fascia posterior compartment of the leg contains: superficially - gastrocnemius m., soleus m., plantaris m.; deeply - popliteus m., tibialis posterior m., flexor digitorum longus m., flexor hallucis longus m.; it also contains the posterior tibial a. and v. and the tibial n.

Lymphatics

Structure Location Afferents from Efferents to Regions drained Notes
popliteal nodes in the popliteal fossa along the popliteal vessels lymphatic vessels that accompany the anterior tibial , posterior tibial and fibular vessels deep and superficial inguinal nodes leg and foot 5 or 6 nodes located in the fat of the popliteal fossa

Joints

Joint or ligament Description Notes
ankle joint the articulation between the distal tibia, the medial malleolus of the tibia, the lateral malleolus of the fibula and the talus a synovial hinge joint; the ankle is reinforced by the deltoid ligament (anterior tibiotalar, tibionavicular, tibiocalcaneal, posterior tibiotalar parts), the anterior talofibular lig., the calcaneofibular lig. and the posterior talofibular lig.; because of the shape of the talus, the ankle is most stable when the foot is dorsiflexed; the ankle is often injured when the foot is plantar flexed
anterior talofibular ligament a ligament that connects the lateral malleolus of the fibula with the anterolateral surface of the talus it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
anterior tibiofibular ligament the ligament that connects the distal ends of the tibia and the fibula anteriorly this ligament reinforces the tibiofibular syndesmosis (at the distal ends of these bones)
anterior tibiotalar ligament part of the deltoid ligament connecting the medial malleolus of the tibia with the talus it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
calcaneofibular ligament a ligament that connects the lateral malleolus of the fibula with the calcaneus it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
deltoid ligament the ligament that connects the medial malleolus of the tibia with the talus, navicular and calcaneus the deltoid ligament reinforces the ankle joint; it has the shape of the Greek letter delta, hence its name; it has four parts (from anterior to posterior): anterior tibiotalar lig., tibionavicular lig., tibiocalcaneal lig., posterior tibiotalar lig.
posterior talofibular ligament a ligament that connects the lateral malleolus of the fibula with the posterolateral surface of the talus it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
posterior tibiofibular ligament the ligament that connects the distal ends of the tibia and the fibula posteriorly this ligament reinforces the tibiofibular syndesmosis (at the distal ends of these bones)
posterior tibiotalar ligament part of the deltoid ligament connecting the medial malleolus of the tibia with the talus posteriorly it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
tibiocalcaneal ligament part of the deltoid ligament connecting the medial malleolus of the tibia with the sustentaculum tali it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint
tibionavicular ligament part of the deltoid ligament connecting the medial malleolus of the tibia with the navicular it is a ligament that reinforces the ankle joint

Other Tables of Interest:


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Some of the material presented in these tables is contained in the book:
MedCharts Anatomy by Thomas R. Gest and Jaye Schlesinger
Published by ILOC, Inc., New York. Copyright 1995.

Content of these tables has been edited for use in this course by Patrick W. Tank, Ph.D.
Copyright 2006, Department of Neurobiology and Developmental Sciences, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

Unauthorized use is prohibited.